Escort Carrier Sailors and Airmen
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The Bogue Class of Escort Carriers

The Bogue-class escort carriers were based on the Maritime Commission's Type C3 cargo ship hull. Most were built by the Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corporation, but some of the early examples were produced by Ingalls Shipbuilding of Pascagoula, Mississippi and by the Western Pipe and Steel Company of San Francisco, California. They all were named for sounds, and were equipped with derricks for retrieving seaplanes and loading and unloading aircraft.

These vessels were equipped with a variety of weapons, including one or two main guns of 4-inch /50 cal, 5-inch /38 cal, or 5-inch /51 cal plus 40 mm Bofors and 20 mm Oerlikons. The type of main gun and number of smaller guns changed over the course of the war. They could carry as many as 28 aircraft operationally, or more if operating as an aircraft transport with additional aircraft secured to the flight deck.

The 10 remaining Bogue-class escort carriers in US service were re-designated helicopter escort carriers (CVHE) in 1955 and 5 of these were re-designated utility escort carriers(CVU) in 1958, then aircraft ferry(AKV) in 1958 and operating under US Maritime Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) during the Vietnam war.

Transfer to the Royal Navy

Most of the ships of the class were transferred to the Royal Navy under the provisions of the Lend-Lease program; they were given new names for their RN service and returned to the U.S. Navy after the war. The first group to be transferred were known by the RN as the Attacker-class; in their place replacements were constructed with the same names for the American fleet. A second group of ships were built and sent almost in its entirety to the Royal Navy, known as the Ameer-class or the Ruler-class in British service, and sometimes as the Prince William-class in the U.S. Navy.

As delivered, these carriers required modifications to conform to Royal Naval standards and, for some ships, the initial works were done at Burrard Dry Dock at Vancouver, Canada. These included extending the flight deck, fitting redesigned flying controls and fighter direction layout, modifications to hangar, accommodation and store rooms, extra safety measures, oiling at sea arrangements, gunnery and other internal communications, extra wireless and radio facilities, ship black-out arrangements and other items deemed necessary for British service.

The consequential delays in getting these ships into active service caused critical comments from some in the U.S. Navy.

Ships

First group (USN Bogue/RN Attacker class)

USS Altamaha (CVE-6) became HMS Battler (D18)

USS Barnes (CVE-7) became HMS Attacker (D02)

USS Block Island (CVE-8) became HMS Hunter (D80)

USS Bogue (CVE-9)

USS Breton (CVE-10) became HMS Chaser (D32)

USS Card (CVE-11)

USS Copahee (CVE-12)

USS Core (CVE-13)

USS Croatan (CVE-14) became HMS Fencer (D64)

USS Hamlin (CVE-15) became HMS Stalker (D91)

USS Nassau (CVE-16)

USS St. George (CVE-17) became HMS Pursuer (D73)

USS Altamaha (CVE-18)

USS Prince William
(CVE-19)
became HMS Striker (D12)

USS Barnes (CVE-20)

USS Block Island (CVE-21) was sunk by the German U-549 northeast of the Canary Islands on 29 May 1944.

USS Breton (CVE-23)

USS Croatan (CVE-25)

HMS Ravager (D70)

HMS Searcher (D40)

HMS Tracker (D24)

Second group (USN Bogue/RN Ameer or Ruler class)

General characteristics as the Attacker class, except for displacement and armament.

USS Prince William (CVE-31)

USS Chatham (CVE-32) became HMS Slinger (D26)

USS Glacier (CVE-33) became HMS Atheling (D51)

USS Pybus (CVE-34) became HMS Emperor (D98)

USS Baffins (CVE-35) became HMS Ameer (D01)

USS Bolinas (CVE-36) became HMS Begum (D38)

USS Bastian (CVE-37) became HMS Trumpeter (D09)

USS Carnegie (CVE-38) became HMS Empress (D42)

USS Cordova (CVE-39) became HMS Khedive (D62)

USS Delgada (CVE-40) became HMS Speaker (D90)

USS Edisto (CVE-41) became HMS Nabob (D77)

USS Estero (CVE-42) became HMS Premier (D23)

USS Jamaica (CVE-43) became HMS Shah (D21)

USS Keweenaw (CVE-44) became HMS Patroller (D07)

USS Prince (CVE-45) became HMS Rajah (D10)

USS Niantic (CVE-46) became HMS Ranee (D03)

USS Perdido (CVE-47) became HMS Trouncer (D85)

USS Sunset (CVE-48) became HMS Thane (D48)

USS St. Andrews (CVE-49) became HMS Queen (D19)

USS St. Joseph (CVE-50) became HMS Ruler (D72)

USS St. Simon (CVE-51) became HMS Arbiter (D31)

USS Vermillion (CVE-52) became HMS Smiter (D55)

USS Willapa (CVE-53) became HMS Puncher (D79)

USS Winjah (CVE-54) became HMS Reaper (D82)

 

Taken from Wikipedia

 
Class overview
Name: Bogue-class escort carrier
Builders: (1) Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding
(2) Ingalls
Shipbuilding

(3) Western Pipe &
Steel
Operators: Royal NavyUnited States Navy
Preceded by: Long Island-class 
escort carrier
Succeeded by: Sangamon-class 
escort carrier
In commission: 1942–1946
Completed: 45
General characteristics
Type: Escort carrier
Displacement: 16,620 long tons (16,890 t)
Length: 496 ft (151 m);
flight deck: 439 ft (134 m)
Beam: 69 ft 6 in (21.18 m);
flight deck: 70 ft
(21 m)
Draught: 26 ft (7.9 m)
Installed power: 8,500 shp (6,300 kW)
Propulsion: 2 × geared steam turbines
2 × boilers
1 × shaft
Speed: 18 kn (21 mph; 33 km/h)
Complement: 646, excluding Air Group
Armament: 2 × 4 in/ 50 caliber gun (1 × 2)
8 × 40 mm 
anti-aircraft guns (4 × 2)
10-35 × 20 mm
anti-aircraft cannons
Aircraft carried: 19-24;
(typical complement:
12 × fighters
(Grumman 
F4F Wildcats)
9 × torpedo bombers 
(Grumman TBF Avengers))
(Supermarine Seafires and Fairey Swordfish, respectively, in RN service.)
Aviation facilities: 2 × elevators
 
 

 

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